Aaron Lumley (North Bay, 1981) is an exploratory contrabassist and improvising musician based out of Montreal. A student of Wilbert de Joode and John Eckhardt, Lumley explores the bass’ natural resonant capacities while working with the aural drama of pushing against the limits of both the self and instrument.  Lumley’s music is polyphonic, polyrhythmic, harmonically-rich and attentive to organic, open-ended evolution.  It deals in beauty, brutality and processes of growth and decay.  Lumley brings his personal sound and approach to a diverse array of projects and situations ranging from solo performances to collaborations with other musicians, dancers and ensembles including:

Jasper Stadhouders, Isaiah Ceccarelli, Joshua Zubot, Onno Govaert, Tobias Delius, George Haddow, John Dikeman, Matt Valentine, L’Ensemble Supermusique, Harald Austbø, Olivier Alary, Ida Toninato, Philippe Lauzier, Marielle Groven, Brandon Valdivia, Terrie Hessels, Kyle Brenders, Malcolm Goldstein, Ben Brown, Michel Lambert, Michel F Coté, Nigel Taylor, Arto Lindsay, Evan Tighe, Aaron Leaney, Jonathan Adjemian, Koen Kaptijn, Ada Rave, Sasha Ivanochko, Daniel Gaucher, Eschaton, Jean Derome’s Résistances Project, Ab Baars, Jesse Zubot, Hamid Drake, Peggy Lee, Eric Chenaux, Doug Tielli, Eric Hove, Andy Haas’ Ask the Oracle, Frank Rosaly, Mike Gennaro, David Prentice, John Oswald, Manuela Tessi, Eric Boeren, John Heward, Michael Vatcher, Pemi Paull, Matthew ‘Doc’ Dunn, Lina Allemano, Nick Fraser, Pierre Tanguay, Craig Pedersen, Rainer Wiens’ Orchestra of Sympathetic Strings, Mike Majkowski, Ken Aldcroft, Thierry Amar, Paul Dutton, Lori Freedman, Colin Fisher, Cor Fuhler, Émilie Girard-Charest, Francois Houle, Nora Mulder, Achim Kaufmann, Susanna Hood, Scott Thomson, Thollem McDonas, Pierre-Yves Martel, Mary-Margaret O’Hara, Jean René, Alexandre St-Onge, Jamie Thompson, Alden Penner, Bernhari, Esmerine, Saltland, ZZ Sharrock plus many others…

 

“Besides physical strength, playing the double bass also requires an energetic willpower that is too rarely met, considering the want of vigour of most bassists in their attack of the string.” — François-Joseph Fétis, 1828